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Clean Eating for Three Days

6 Jan

I thought for the new year I would start off on the right foot and meal prep a little for a healthy week of eating. Last semester I tried to do this as much as possible and not only does it allow you to eat cleaner, it makes for an easier week of cooking if you prep everything on Sunday. Here’s what I ate this week, and I’ll also include a couple of my tips in maintaining a good diet! Happy cooking!

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Tuesday:

Breakfast: Over easy egg with pepper and salt, 1 slice of whole grain toast

Lunch: 1/4th cup of white rice, 1 fillet fish, 1 cup of broccoli, 1 half cup of carrots

Dinner: Whole wheat spaghetti with half pasta sauce and half chopped fresh cherry tomatoes

Wednesday:

Breakfast: Over easy egg with pepper and salt, 1 slice of whole grain toast

Lunch: 1/4th cup of white rice, 1 baked fish, 1 cup of broccoli, 1 half cup of carrots

Dinner: Sliced potatoes baked with seasoning, meatballs with 1 bread roll, Veggies of choice

Thursday:

Breakfast: ½ cup of low-fat yogurt with cinnamon

Lunch: ½ cup of grilled chicken, 1 cup of broccoli, 1 cup of carrots, ¼ cup of white rice

Dinner: 1 cup fried white rice in olive oil and seasonings of choice, add bagged frozen veggies and fresh tomatoes, add sliced chicken or scrambled egg if desired

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Snacks throughout the week:

  • Frozen grapes
  • Sliced apples
  • Sliced strawberries
  • Frozen blackberries
  • Carrot sticks
  • Sliced broccoli

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Tips to stay on track:

  1. Pre-slice everything when you come from the grocery store
    1. This has helped me the most this past year as I have gotten better at storing and eating my food. If I don’t do this when I get home from the store, odds are I will forget about the veggies I bought or whatever else, and stuff tends to go bad faster
  1. Buy versatile ingredients
    1. Try and buy ingredients you could throw into any dish, instead of really specific items that only are cooked well in one or two dishes. For instance, I try to buy spinach so I can throw it in anything I make: omelets, pasta, sandwiches, salads, etc. It will help you not only be mindful of using your groceries but help you stretch your dollar as well.
  1. Cheat when you want to
    1. This is perhaps the biggest tip. EAT WHAT YOU WANT. Everything is good in moderation, so don’t completely try and strip everything from your diet. Trust me you will be more likely to fail from eating healthy and you will be unhappy if you get rid of the things you love. Just remember everything in its own proportions and you’ll be fine.

~ Mandi

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The Big Switch

9 Sep

“What’s your major?” It’s basically the first question that you get asked when you meet someone on a college campus. When I graduated high school I was so sure of the major I’d selected when I applied and my career path after graduation. But when I got to orientation, something didn’t feel quite right. I had absolutely no passion for the major I’d chosen. Looking at the 4-year curriculum ahead of me just wasn’t thrilling. For me, that wasn’t what I came to college for. So I changed my major for the first time about a week later. Over the summer I added a second degree focused on my favorite subject in high school.

Throughout the course of my freshman year, I was really unsure of what I wanted to do with myself. I knew the sciences were a strong fit for me, but I couldn’t find anything that sparked something in me. I’ve always believed that you can truly see when someone has found the perfect thing for them because they will absolutely light up when they talk about it. I wanted that feeling more than anything. Instead, I was dragging myself from class to class to clubs every day. Truthfully I was so busy that I didn’t have much time to feel bored.

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Life is all about growing and changing

I started out as a pre-med student, but I wanted to be sure that I was choosing the right career path because pre-rec classes are different for different professional schools. So I signed up for a 1 unit health careers exploration colloquium, and it was one of the best decisions I made that year. I knew one of my club advisors was a graduate student in public health, but I never thought to ask her more about the field itself. Early on in the colloquium, we had a group of panelists from a variety of career paths including a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, and public health professional. I was immediately drawn to public health because of its big-picture perspective on health. From there I talked to my advisor about what she was studying and then it clicked. I’d finally found that spark. That summer I changed my major for the fifth and final time.

I felt some pressure throughout the process of finding the right major to just stay the course for a year and see how it went. But deep down inside I knew that wasn’t going to help me enjoy my freshman year. I had already lost interest, so I didn’t want to waste my time. In the end, the process helped me to know myself better and ultimately led me to the perfect path.

-Gabriela

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Stay Organized, Wildcats!

28 Aug

The beginning of the school year is an exciting time! There are so many events to attend, new people to meet, clubs to join, and a full schedule of classes to adjust to. As college students, we get to decide how we want to use our time. It can be overwhelming to keep track of everything, but having an organizational system helps make it easier to manage. Ultimately you will have to find out what works best for you. Here are my top 5 tips to stay organized in college.

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Arriving on campus is so exciting!

1. Get a planner- and use it!
It may seem obvious, but having a planner is essential to getting by in college. There are so many types of physical planners to choose from, and lots of templates if you want to create your own customized one. If you’re going to use a paper planner, it is helpful to have one that shows the whole month and then has space for each day to write down homework assignments, meal plans, things that you need to remember to bring, work shifts, etc.

Paper planner isn’t your thing? That’s okay! There are a lot of online options to help you stay on top of assignments. Google calendar is available through your Catmail account to help you keep track of time commitments and you can set reminders. Google keep is also a free service that allows you to keep to-do lists and also has a reminder function. If you decide to stick to a strictly digital planning system, try to stick to one or two that work really well for you so that assignments don’t fall through the cracks.

2. Your syllabus is your best friend

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Everything is better with support!

Once you get your syllabi, look for the section with your assignments and exams and put them into your planner. With longer projects and papers, it can be helpful to work backwards from the due date and give yourself deadlines to finish certain tasks since your professors won’t be checking in to keep you on track. Remember to keep looking back for instructions on how to complete assignments. I like to cross assignments off each week, and it helps me stay motivated.

3. Keep workspaces simple
Keep your desk surface as clear as possible so that you have room to spread out books and notebooks while you’re doing homework. It’s much more difficult to focus on the task at hand when there’s too much going on at your desk. Consolidate your school supplies to one place that is easy to reach from your desk. I like having a pencil cup on my desk with pencils, pens, and a pair of scissors and keep extra paper and index cards in a drawer nearby. Putting everything away after you’re done working helps keep your workspace feel peaceful.

4. Avoid the mountain of papers

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Don’t forget to file your paperwork.

As the semester goes on, you will be receiving lots of papers from your professors and getting assignments handed back. It is very easy for those papers to become unmanageable and end up all over your desk, in the inner hidden corners of your backpack that you never knew existed, behind your bed, or under the couch. Some of those pieces of paper could be really important- you could need those tests and papers in case something isn’t put into D2L correctly and get back the points you earned. Even if there isn’t a grading mistake, your TAs do leave useful feedback on your assignments to help you improve the next time around! Set aside a day of the week to sort papers into their appropriate folders, and if you need to take action on something (for example a change of schedule form), keep it easily accessible in your backpack so that you don’t risk missing a deadline.

5. Keep classes separate
In high school, it was easy to use one binder for all of my classes. When I got to college I realized that each class takes up a lot of space and the one-binder-fits-all method was not going to work anymore. Some people are more visual and like to color code, so if that helps you out use it! I like to have a different color notebook with a matching folder for each class so that it is easy to grab the materials for the different classes each day when I’m in a rush!

Getting organized can be a fun process and it’s a great time to try out new things and see what fits your needs the best. Once you have something that works, you will realize that you save a lot of time and can focus on what we’re all here for- to get that degree! Best of luck with the new year, Wildcats!

-Gabriela

Essential Essentials

15 Aug

Here you go, off to college, finally going to be on your own! You have probably been waiting/ dreading this moment all summer, but now it’s finally here! Here are a few things that we think are essential for Wildcats to bring to make living away from home comfortable.

Residence Hall

Living in the residence hall is an experience unlike any other. You simultaneously get a feeling of immense freedom, followed by slight suffocation. A common mistake first year students make is bringing too much stuff all at once. Trust me, you do not need your entire semester’s stock of food in your room the first day you move in. Try to plan your meals ahead of time, that way you know exactly what you need to buy at the store and nothing goes bad.  You also don’t need to bring pots and pans because you will be able to check them out from the front desk in your residence hall. But you will want to make sure you have dish soap and sponges to clean your borrowed equipment. The biggest thing to remember when living in the hall is the importance of preserving space, so instead of bringing your entire wardrobe with you, try to bring clothes that are seasonally appropriate and swap them out as you need them. Having a printer in your room will be welcome, but you’ll want to find a small one because space is limited!

Apartment

Living in an apartment is completely different than living in a residence hall! You will again be tempted to bring absolutely everything you own to your new apartment, but you should think about that first. While this new space is larger than a shared room in a residence hall, it still has a spacial limit. You should try to coordinate with your new roommate(s) for kitchen items such as pots and pans, dishes, and storage containers. It gives you an opportunity to reach out to your roommates before you move in and prevents you from having to buy, pack, and lug all of your own stuff. No one needs three sets of pots and pans! If you are living in a student apartment, chances are it comes furnished. If you aren’t, then that will be another necessity for you to think about.

The overall theme here is don’t get carried away. Bringing too much stuff to your new place will make it feel crowded and messy, and no one wants to live in that! Leaving some of your stuff at home will also make it nicer when you visit!

-Chrissy

What’s One More Language?

8 Jul

To the eyes of a child, summer is the epitome of freedom. There’s no school or homework, they can sleep in and not have a care in the world. Unfortunately, the older a person gets,the more they wish they would’ve done during those long glorious summers. I am not going to sit here and say that I have utilized my summer to the max and not wasted a single minute, because let’s face it, I have spent a good amount of time vegging out in front of my T.V., but I have also begun something I vowed to do three years ago: I am teaching myself German!

Some might ask why I don’t just take German as my second language in school, but as it stands I am already taking both Greek and Latin and adding anything else onto that would be too much (trust me, I tried it).

Why German you ask? Originally it was because I really liked the way it sounds. I also figured it might be easier to learn since English is based off of it, I was wrong in this aspect. It did not hurt that I was informed I would have to learn it in grad school, and so learning it now would provide me with a leg up!

Actually learning the language was interesting. I found a surprising amount of similarities between it and Greek and Latin, this was a relief since I know those languages. As with all languages, the hard part was the vocabulary. I am an audio learner, and so not having an instructor was hard. This was more of a problem because unlike my other two languages, this one is not dead! While I feel like I am starting to understand the language, there is quite a bit more I need to do before I am proficient, none the less, I am proud of the progress I have made and I think I will keep casually learning the language!

Auf Wiedersehen zur Zeit! (Goodbye for now!)

-Christine

Chrissy’s Summer Reading List

10 Jun

Summertime,  the most relaxing word a college student can hear, say, or think. Summertime opens up a plethora of opportunities that are not available during the school year: sleeping until 1pm, going on random road trips, and of course reading fun books. I don’t know about y’all, but I find that during the school year I am way too busy reading the various assigned readings to  actually get any fun reading done! So, I made a list during the school year of all the books I would like to read during them summer and I am now steadily working my way through them! Here are my top 10 books that I would like to have read by the end of the summer. I included short summaries of the books that I found on the publishers’ websites.

Please note that most of these contain adult themes and violence. Please read at your own discretion. 

10. Ella Enchanted: Gail Carson Levine

How can a fairy’s blessing be such a curse?

At her birth, Ella of Frell was given a foolish fairy’s gift—the “gift” of obedience. Ella must obey any order given to her, whether it’s hopping on one foot for a day or chopping off her own head!

But strong-willed Ella does not tamely accept her fate. She goes on a quest, encountering ogres, giants, wicked stepsisters, fairy godmothers, and handsome princes, determined to break the curse—and live happily ever after.

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9. Dracula: Bram Stoker

During a business visit to Count Dracula’s castle in Transylvania, a young English solicitor finds himself at the center of a series of horrifying incidents. Jonathan Harker is attacked by three phantom women, observes the Count’s transformation from human to bat form, and discovers puncture wounds on his own neck that seem to have been made by teeth. Harker returns home upon his escape from Dracula’s grim fortress, but a friend’s strange malady — involving sleepwalking, inexplicable blood loss, and mysterious throat wounds — initiates a frantic vampire hunt. The popularity of Bram Stoker’s 1897 horror romance is as deathless as any vampire.  Its supernatural appeal has spawned a host of film and stage adaptations, and more than a century after its initial publication, it continues to hold readers spellbound.

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8. The Blood of Flowers: Anita Amirrezvani

Both a sweeping love story and a luminous portrait of a city, The Blood of Flowers is the mesmerizing historical novel of an ill-fated young woman whose gift as a rug designer transforms her life. Illuminated with glorious detail of Persian rug-making, and brilliantly bringing to life the sights sounds and life of 17th-century Isfahan, The Blood of Flowers has captured readers’ imaginations everywhere as a timeless tale of one woman’s struggle to live a life of her choosing.

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7. The Iliad: Homer

Dating to the ninth century B.C., Homer’s timeless poem still vividly conveys the horror and heroism of men and gods wrestling with towering emotions and battling amidst devastation and destruction, as it moves inexorably to the wrenching, tragic conclusion of the Trojan War. Renowned classicist Bernard Knox observes in his superb introduction that although the violence of the Iliad is grim and relentless, it coexists with both images of civilized life and a poignant yearning for peace

The iliad

6. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep: Philip K. Dick

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.
By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn’t afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.
Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn’t want to be identified, they just blended in.
Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

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5. 13 Reasons Why: Jay Asher

You can’t stop the future. 
You can’t rewind the past.
The only way to learn the secret . . . is to press play.

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker—his classmate and crush—who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah’s voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why.
Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah’s pain, and as he follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his town, what he discovers changes his life forever.

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4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone: J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter has no idea how famous he is. That’s because he’s being raised by his miserable aunt and uncle who are terrified Harry will learn that he’s really a wizard, just as his parents were. But everything changes when Harry is summoned to attend an infamous school for wizards, and he begins to discover some clues about his illustrious birthright. From the surprising way he is greeted by a lovable giant, to the unique curriculum and colorful faculty at his unusual school, Harry finds himself drawn deep inside a mystical world he never knew existed and closer to his own noble destiny.

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3. Brave New World: Aldous Huxley

The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley’s vision of the future- of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing critical light on the present and is considered to be Huxley’s most enduring masterpieces.

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2. The Other Boleyn Girl: Philipa Gregory

When Mary Boleyn comes to court as an innocent girl of fourteen, she catches the eye of the handsome and charming Henry VIII. Dazzled by the king, Mary falls in love with both her golden prince and her growing role as unofficial queen. However, she soon realizes just how much she is a pawn in her family’s ambitious plots as the king’s interest begins to wane, and soon she is forced to step aside for her best friend and rival: her sister, Anne. With her own destiny suddenly unknown, Mary realizes that she must defy her family and take fate into her own hands.

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1. Poison Study: Maria V. Snyder

About to be executed for murder, Yelena is offered an extraordinary reprieve. She’ll eat the best meals, have rooms in the palace- and risk assassination by anyone trying to kill the Commander of Ixia. And so Yelena chooses to become a food taster. But the chief of security, leaving nothing to chance, deliberately feeds her Butterfly’s Dusté and only by appearing for her daily antidote will she delay an agonizing death from the poison. As Yelena tries to escape her new dilemma, disasters keep mounting. Rebels plot to seize Ixia and Yelena develops magical powers she can’t control. Her life is threatened again and choices must be made. But this time the outcomes aren’t so clear—.

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Worst Moment Ever

15 Apr

It was the Spring Semester of my first year at the U of A and I felt like registration was going to be a breeze. Registering for my Spring courses had been easy. I orchestrated a nice schedule for myself, got up early with my roommate, clicked the finish enrollment button and within minutes I had all the classes I needed.Unfortunately I was wrong. This would be the worst registration experience of undergraduate career.

I woke up early, put on my glasses, washed my face, brushed my teeth, grabbed my laptop and walked downstairs to the common room with my roommate. We both grabbed donuts and hot chocolate and settled in at a nice table. I logged into UAccess and pulled up my shopping cart. I had 5 minutes to spare, so I ate my donut and sipped my hot chocolate. At 5:59am I refreshed my page. At 6:00am I pressed finished enrollment. At 6:03am I was redirected to a page and was blocked from enrolling. At 6:10am I had logged in on 3 different devices and tried to finish enrolling countless times. By 6:15am my R.A. was helping me figure out why I wasn’t able to enroll. Turns out I was already considered a sophomore because of all the Advanced Placement Credit I had come in with and all the units I had already completed. I was devastated.

Missing my enrollment period was the worst thing that could happen to me in that moment. Being a science major, there was a very specific order I needed to take my classes in, and it also meant that many of my classes were in high demand, making the whole situation even worse because of the competition for seats in my classes. I felt stupid and dumbfounded because I thought I had everything under control. I thought I could do it all on my own. I didn’t really have anyone in a position of authority I felt comfortable approaching to ask questions. I planned to have my advisor meeting after I had registered so that we could just double check things. I didn’t know that I would actually need help. I was also a little angry because I didn’t even know where to look to find out what was wrong. I felt under prepared and disappointed.

Thankfully, I was able to scramble around and pull things together over the next few months so that in the Fall, I had all the classes I needed. I would check UAccess multiple times a day to see if the classes I needed opened up, and I was fortunate enough to make the cut at the last minute. My schedule was not sexy at all. There were 8ams and art history classes and nothing was convenient or easy, but I learned how to push myself and to stay focused on what matters most. I do not recommend missing your enrollment period at all, it is hectic and just awful. All I can say is that I made it through, and I never messed up on registration ever again.

#MiddlingMarch: Chrissy Gets Her Groove Back

29 Mar

Of all the breaks and days off we have, Spring Break is the worst. It is just long enough that we delude ourselves that we can put off doing school work for a few days, but not long enough for that to actually be the case. Please, don’t get me wrong, I absolutely love Spring Break, I cherish the fact that I don’t have to be at school at 7:30 in the morning everyday, but coming back from break is always the hardest thing to do.

Personally, to avoid the awkward phase of getting back into the swing of school, I do school-type things over the break. This break, I visited the University of Washington to check out their graduate program. I was able to talk to the Professors I could potentially be working with to get my PhD. Doing this helped me refocus my vision. Throughout your school years, you might forget why you came to college in the first place, and it is a good idea to remind yourself. If graduate school is not in the books for you, spend some time talking to people in your field. Sometimes you have to focus on the end goals a bit to stay motivated.

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Of course, I did not visit Seattle without visiting the sites! I was there for three days, and while one was spent at the University, the other two were spent touring around Seattle. I visited the Chihuly Glass Museum, the Seattle Aquarium, Pike-Market Place (where we saw them throw fish at customers) and of course the Space Needle. It was the right amount of school and relaxing.

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Glass 2

It’s not always easy to flit off to schools you’re interested in, but looking up programs is a great way to focus your mind on the future and to remind yourself what you are working toward. It is never too early to start planning your future!

-Chrissy

Spring Cleaning

7 Mar

Spring is supposed to be a time for new beginnings. This is why we have Spring Cleaning- so we can clean up our lives and get rid of all the icky stuff. Sometimes this means letting go of bad relationships and bad habits.

Spring has always been a time of productivity for me. I usually take on multiple projects and really hit my stride. The spring semester of my junior year was the first time I truly embrace the idea of spring cleaning, and tried something new for myself.

During the fall semester of my Junior year, I had a falling out with my roommate, who happened to be my best friend, it was my first semester working, and it was just a difficult time for me. When spring finally arrived, I was motivated to make a change for myself and focus on my personal growth. I decided to stop holding on to all the hurt my ex-bestfriend had caused, I chose to get more involved at work, and I stayed on top of all my classes. Doing this was difficult. Hitting a bad patch in life is extremely hard because it taints all areas of your life. I had never felt more alone than I did during the fall semester my junior year, but as I started to focus on work and classes my loneliness started to dissipate. I made new friends from class and work, I felt productive as my grades started to improve, and I started to appreciate myself more.

Trying new things can be stressful and may seem unrewarding at first, but stick it out and things will get better. I needed time to focus on myself and replenish my supply of inner peace. I am much better off now because I took the time to check in with myself and reorganize my priorities. It is now my the spring semester of my senior year and the good habits I created a year ago are still paying off. Don’t be afraid to stand up for yourself and make changes. You deserve to be appreciated and cared for, and it’s okay to take the time to appreciate and care for yourself. Always keep fighting, and embrace spring cleaning.

-Erika

#FearlessFebruary: Filing Fears

29 Feb

This month, I did something just about every adult in North America does this time of year: taxes. While this might seem to be a mundane task, it was quite frightening for me, as it is for many first time filers. Now that I have filed though, I see that it was not as bad as I thought it was going to be and I started wondering where the stigmas and fears come from.

Part of the fear stems from the fact that this is something “adults” do. While I am over the age of 18, it has not seemed to hit me yet that I am considered an adult. I am still in school and doing many of the same things I was doing when I was underage; as a result, I have not yet fully transitioned into “adult mode”.

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Another part of the fear comes from the stigma that filing taxes is hard and takes a long time. Growing up, at least for me, February-April was a time of stress and anxiety. My parents would pour over every receipt looking for ways to get more money back, and as a result they noticed all the frivolous money they had spent over the year and the tension in the house was high. Luckily for me, I keep a pretty good track of what I spend, and the actual filing was fairly easy because I used an online program. I filed mine within two hours, which considering I had no clue what I was doing, it went pretty fast.

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The final fear people have when filing their taxes is that they will mess up and they will owe money or be accused of fraud (or at least this was my fear). In the end though as I said before, filing was fairly simple and while you may end up owing some money, every case is different, at least you’ll know that you passed this large milestone.

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-Chrissy Ellis